Job ID: 5405

Ph.D. Student in Heidelberg/Germany

Position: Ph.D. Student

Deadline: 31 March 2021

City: Heidelberg

Country: Germany

Institution: Heidelberg University

Department: Institute of Neurobiology

Description:

A PhD student position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Ana M.M. Oliveira at the Heidelberg University, Institute of Neurobiology. Our group investigates the molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation and maintenance of memories. We focus on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of gene expression that is critical for the stabilization of memories for long periods of time. The successful candidate will investigate the function of DNA methylation in memory persistence as well as study the underlying causes of cognitive deficits in pathological conditions. The project will use a multidisciplinary approach that combines molecular and behavioral techniques and viral vectors to modulate the expression of target genes.

The position is funded for three years and is expected to start during the summer of 2021.

The candidate should be highly motivated, with good interpersonal and communication skills and show willingness to work in an international environment (working language is English). The candidate should hold a Masters (or equivalent) degree in Biology, Biochemistry or Neuroscience. He/She should have a strong background in molecular and cell biology and previous experience with animal handling (FELASA) would be an advantage but not mandatory.

Applications must be submitted via the HBIGS website
(http://www.hbigs.uni-heidelberg.de/main_application.html)

References:
Kubra Gulmez Karaca, Janina Kupke, David CV Brito, Benjamin Zeuch, Christian Thome, Dieter Weichenhan, Pavlo Lutsik, Christoph Plass, Ana MM Oliveira (2020) Neuronal ensemble-specific DNA methylation strengthens engram stability. Nature Communications. 11(1):639
David CV Brito, Janina Kupke, Kubra Gulmez Karaca, Benjamin Zeuch, Ana MM Oliveira (2020) Mimicking age-associated Gadd45g dysregulation results in memory impairments in young adult mice. Journal of Neuroscience. 40(6)1197-1210

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